February 8, 2017

The Junior Show

Junior Show, one of the College’s most creative and student-driven traditions, has been a source of entertainment and general merriment on campus for more than a century. It features an original play that is typically heavy on humor and parody. Costumes, dance numbers, songs, inside jokes and a smattering of stereotypical representations of both Mount Holyoke and the other members of the Five Colleges? Yes, yes, yes!

Initially produced by the senior class, and known as Senior Show, the tradition was passed to the junior class in 1920 and subsequently recoined. It comes around each February — a welcome bright spot during a predictably bleak time of winter.

January 25, 2017

M&Cs: What’s not to love?

To a college student at any other institution, 9:30 p.m. is just a time. But for Mount Holyoke students, 9:30 – 10 p.m. means only one thing: M&Cs. And M&Cs, in case you don’t know, means milk and cookies.

January 23, 2017

Siblings for life

The Big/Little program is one of Mount Holyoke’s oldest traditions, tracing its origins back to the early 1900s. At its heart, the program is a really simple recipe for friendship: a junior (the “Big”) is paired up with an incoming first-year student (the “Little”). Big + Little = friends.

November 28, 2016

An enchanting, entrancing tradition

Before there was speech, was there song? Before there was ready light, was there a flickering glow? The deepest reaches of the human heart seem to know these truths instinctively. That such simple sensory experiences—voices raised, candles held close, warm bodies seated side by side—can elicit such profound feelings of comfort, peace, and kinship speaks to the power of embedded memory. Were we made to sing? To make music? To be together? To reflect? To connect?

Mount Holyoke community members—and members of the public—contemplate these questions year after year at the College’s annual Vespers concerts. The 2016 concerts are Sunday, December 4, at 4:00 and 7:30 pm.

November 4, 2016

Founder’s Day: the legacy lives

After two years of dogged fundraising—and raising of eyebrows throughout Massachusetts—one woman’s dream became a reality. In a time when higher education for women did not exist. When educating women was seen not just as unnecessary, but as harmful and subversive.

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